Protecting 108 Years of History in Midtown St. Louis

Posted on: May 27th, 2015 by Special Contributor No Comments

 

By Shannon Craig

3010 Apartments from Washington Avenue in Midtown St. Louis. The rehabilitation of Father Dunne’s Newsboys Home and Protectorate represents a $15M investment in the Midtown community. | Credit: Salvation Army

3010 Apartments from Washington Avenue in Midtown St. Louis. The rehabilitation of Father Dunne’s Newsboys Home and Protectorate represents a $15 million investment in the Midtown community. | Credit: Salvation Army

The dawn of the 20th century in St. Louis introduced a wealth of changes to the city. Development to account for a population influx, the announcement of the city as the site of the 1904 World’s Fair, and St. Louis’ establishment as a Midwestern trade hub, all furthered the city’s first initiatives to provide social services to those in need. One of these early initiatives, the Newsboys Home and Protecterate (today known as 3010 Washington Avenue) has provided social services to city residents for more than a century, and now, thanks to a recent rehab, it will be able to continue to serve as a much-needed resource for the local population.

In 1907, Father Peter Dunne developed and built the Second Renaissance/Romanesque Revival three-story structure at 3010 Washington Avenue. The Newsboys Home and Protectorate, as Father Dunne called it, provided a home for boys who were considered a “nuisance” in Midtown St. Louis. Orphans, half-orphans and working children, ranging from four to 17 years old, were taken in to the Newsboys Home and Protectorate for hot meals, shelter and an education in trade. The facility hosted stables, areas for bootblacking, a print shop and a music hall, along with a number of shared dormitories, a laundry and a chapel. At the time, the social and physical structure of the facility was lauded as “a home rather than an institution,” a commendable distinction in a time when overcrowded group homes were considered the norm.... Read More →

Old Places Matter to North Carolinians 

Posted on: May 22nd, 2015 by Preservation Leadership Forum Staff No Comments

 

Ramah Presbyterian Church and Cemetery, Huntersville, N.C. | Credit:  Thompson Mayes

Ramah Presbyterian Church and Cemetery, Huntersville, N.C. | Credit: Thompson Mayes

Tom Mayes grew up in North Carolina and attended college and law school there. If you have been reading his blogs “Why Do Old Places Matter?” you would know already about his love for the state and its historic places. As he sets out his reasons for why old places matter, North Carolina’s older and historic places are ever present in his reflections.

Mayes writes about the sense of community he felt at an old white frame Ramah church; he writes about better understanding religious tolerance at Old Salem; and he writes about the craftsmanship of mantels and newel posts in an old house near his childhood home in Caldwell Station.... Read More →

Collections: To Move Forward, You Must Plan

Posted on: May 19th, 2015 by Carrie Villar No Comments

 

Inside the studio at Chesterwood. | Credit: National Trust for Historic Preservation

Inside the studio at Chesterwood. | Credit: National Trust for Historic Preservation

`What do thumbtacks, Napoleon’s death mask, a slave brand, and a Thomas Affleck sofa all have in common? They are all accessioned objects in the National Trust’s museum collections. These four disparate objects from our sites across the country illustrate the diversity of objects that the Trust has collected over the past 65 years and that the organization continues to steward at its historic sites. In fact, the Trust’s first object, an embroidered footstool, was acquired in 1949, before the organization became the owner of any of its historic sites.

A Year Ago

In June 2014, the National Trust’s Board of Trustees approved a revised Collections Management Policy that, for the first time, included historic structures and landscapes as part of the museum collections. While this major revision has received the most attention, there were other changes that had important, if subtler, implications for the National Trust’s collections.

One of these is the new requirement that every site must have a collections plan that includes a vision and rationale for its collection as well as a scope of collections. This requirement to have a collections plan is a major step in ensuring the management of the collections is strategic and intellectually rigorous.... Read More →