preservationVENTURE: A Real Estate Reading List

Posted on: July 25th, 2014 by Preservation Leadership Forum Staff No Comments

 

PastForward_LOGO_RGBImmerse yourself in real estate at the PastForward conference in Savannah this fall. How? Start your real estate experience at PastForward with preservationVenture Trust Live on Thursday, November 13 followed by six Real-Estate Learning Labs, sponsored by The 1772 Foundation. Why? To learn about Program-related Investments (PRIs), revolving funds, rightsizing, affordable housing, rehabilitation tax credits, the real estate development process, basic debt and equity calculations, deal structuring, and tax incentives, syndication and much more.

Interested? Then sign up for PastForward. And to make the most of your three days in Savannah, take a crack at the following reading list before you arrive. Let’s start with tax credits:

In a Preservation Leadership Forum blog post “The Federal Historic Tax Credit: Transforming Communities,” Donovan Rypkema, one of the preservation field’s most respected economists and a speaker at the “Beauty vs. the Bottom Line” Learning Lab, summarizes findings from his recent report on the catalytic impacts of federal historic tax credit projects in six neighborhoods in Georgia, Maryland and Utah.

Renee Kuhlman, the National Trust’s director of Special Projects, Government Relations and Policy, delves into several states’ historic tax credit programs and their resulting benefits in her Preservation Leadership Forum post, “Daring to be Different: Innovative Historic Tax Credits.” Kuhlman will be leading a Power Session on state tax credits in Savannah.... Read More →

The Pullman Facade Legacy Project

Posted on: July 23rd, 2014 by Special Contributor No Comments

 

Pullman Facade Legacy Project | Credit: Beman Committee

Pullman Facade Legacy Project | Credit: Beman Committee

By Arthur Pearson

Pullman, a National Historic Landmark district in Chicago, was the brainchild of railcar magnate George Pullman. Built between 1880 and 1894, it was the first planned model industrial community in the United States. Pullman is rare if not unique among Chicago landmark districts in that all of its contributing structures were designed by a single architect: Solon Spencer Beman. It is notable, too, for being the largest Chicago landmark district. Its several industrial buildings and more than 900 units of original housing represent about 10 percent of all Chicago landmark structures.

Widely celebrated for its significance in urban planning, transportation history and labor history, Pullman became a state landmark in 1969, a National Historic Landmark in 1971 and a Chicago landmark in 1972. In 2014, legislation was introduced to designate Pullman as a National Historical Park, and the National Trust included Pullman Historic District in its portfolio of National Treasures.

Pullman has a variety of housing styles and building types, but until recently the absence of a comprehensive, detailed survey of facade types and their myriad facade elements proved a barrier to accurate restoration efforts for many of these buildings.... Read More →

Finding the Women: Where Are the Women’s History Sites?

Posted on: July 21st, 2014 by Karen Nickless 1 Comment

 

The Modjeska Simkins House in Columbia, SC, was the site of many meetings between Simkins, Thurgood Marshall and other activists. It was here that Briggs v. Elliott was written, a SC case that became, in 1954, one of the cases grouped in the Supreme Court case, Brown v. Board of Education.  | Credit: Historic Colombia Foundation

The Modjeska Simkins House in Columbia, SC, was the site of many meetings between Simkins, Thurgood Marshall and other activists. It was here that Briggs v. Elliott was written, a SC case that became, in 1954, one of the cases grouped in the Supreme Court case, Brown v. Board of Education. | Credit: Historic Colombia Foundation

If a fellow preservationist called you and asked to go on a women’s history tour of your community, what would you say? Would a number of women’s sites come to mind? A few? Only those related to a famous woman? Would you tell her you would get back to her, or say with confidence that there are no women’s history sites in your community?

I guarantee if you answered the latter or could only think of a few that you are wrong. I don’t care if you are a guide at Alcatraz or the Hagley Mill in Delaware or work as a planner in a small town or are a neighborhood activist. Women are there. If you don’t believe me, we can play “stump the blogger.” Just leave a comment naming a “woman free zone” and I will find the women.

But how do you find them? Some are relatively easy, for instance homes of famous women, such as Susan B. Anthony, or places where women left their mark on the workplace, such as the Lowell Mills. These are women-focused sites. But what about the sites that aren’t obvious, but still contain a women’s narrative? Unlike historic architecture, women’s (and other minority) sites can’t be identified by a “windshield survey.” Factories where women worked look the same as factories that employed men. Houses where significant (but not famous) women resided usually look the same as the house next door. Women’s sites are hidden in plain sight, and are most often known by oral history and documentary research.... Read More →